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Meet Paul...

Paul is a self-employed accountant who loves surfing and the outdoors. Paul has a 2-year-old daughter and he and his wife Lucy are trying for another baby.

“I try to keep my psoriasis under control but sometimes the treatment itself is the bigger inconvenience.”

Age

31

Occupation

Self-employed accountant.

Key consideration

Low compliance with topicals
and phototherapy.

Medical history

Paul is a non-smoker and occasional drinker. He is generally in good health with no other relevant medical history.

Paul’s psoriasis

Paul was diagnosed with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis aged 26. Lesions are predominantly on his back.

For the last 5 years he has been using topicals: vitamin D analogues and potent steroid creams that he struggles to apply to his back as instructed.

Paul’s dermatologist recommended phototherapy, but Paul can’t commit to the frequent sessions.

Treatment options

Because Paul struggles to apply topical creams as instructed and cannot commit to phototherapy, Skilarence® (dimethyl fumarate) could be a suitable next treatment for him.

What treatment option would you choose for this patient?

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NICE treatment recommendations1

Systemic non-biological therapies should be used for people with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis if it cannot be controlled with topical therapy

AND

it has a significant impact on physical, psychological or social well-being

AND

any of the following apply:

Psoriasis is extensive.
For example, >10% of BSA
affected or PASI score of >10

Psoriasis is localised and
associated with significant functional impairment and/or high levels of distress (e.g. involvement at high-impact sites)

Phototherapy has been ineffective, cannot be used or has resulted in rapid relapse (>50% of baseline disease severity within 3 months)

If you have any questions, our representatives are on hand for further information about Skilarence®.

BSA, body surface area. DLQI, Dermatology Life Quality Index.
NICE, National Institute of Health and Care Excellence.
PASI, Psoriasis Area Severity Index.

Reference: 1. NICE. Psoriasis assessment and management (CG153). 2012. Available at: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg153.

Related

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See how Skilarence® can help more patients with psoriasis. Click on a patient to find out more.

UK-IEDMF-2100002

March 2021

“I try to keep my psoriasis under control but sometimes the treatment itself is the bigger inconvenience.”

Meet Paul...

Paul is a self-employed accountant who loves surfing and the outdoors. Paul has
a 2-year-old daughter and he and his wife Lucy are trying for another baby.

Age: 31

Occupation: Self-employed accountant.

Key consideration: Low compliance with topicals
and phototherapy.

Paul’s psoriasis

Paul was diagnosed with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis aged 26. Lesions are predominantly on his back.

For the last 5 years he has been using topicals: vitamin D analogues and potent steroid creams that he struggles to apply to his back as instructed.

Paul’s dermatologist recommended phototherapy, but Paul can’t commit to the frequent sessions.

Medical history

Paul is a non-smoker and occasional drinker. He is generally in good health with no other relevant medical history.

Treatment options

Because Paul struggles to apply topical creams as instructed and cannot commit to phototherapy, Skilarence® could be a suitable next treatment for him.

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